Dry Socket

It’s easy to treat – but may be uncomfortable

Dry socket (Alveolar Osteitis) can occur following the extraction of a permanent tooth.

Under a normal situation, a blood clot would form after the tooth is extracted. This blood clot would form a layer of protection for the bone below.

Dry socket occurs when the blood clot fails to develop or dissolves. This can leave the bone exposed to food, liquids fluids or even air: anything that can enter the mouth. This is where the discomfort comes in: the exposed area could remain painful for several days.

Anytime you suffer pain after a tooth extraction, it’s always a good idea to get in touch with your oral surgeon right away.

Treatment for dry socket

The comforting news is that dry socket does not require surgery. Your oral surgeon will examine the region, thoroughly clean it, and usually recommend one of more of these medications to help heal the socket

  • Antibacterial mouthwashes
  • Antiseptic solutions for the wound area
  • Medicated dressings

After the dressing has been removed, your oral surgeon will likely encourage you to promote healing by:

  • Taking pain medications as prescribed
  • Avoiding all tobacco products
  • Drinking lots of water
  • Rinsing your mouth gently with salt water several times a day
  • Brushing your teeth gently around the dry socket area

If you feel any pain or a worsening of the condition, be sure to call your oral surgeon immediately.

Did you know?

The precise cause of dry socket remains the subject of study. Researchers suspect that certain issues may be involved, such as:

  • Bacterial contamination of the socket
  • Trauma at the surgical site from a difficult extraction, as with an impacted wisdom tooth

Source: Mayo Clinic

Did you know?

Only about 2% of tooth extractions result in dry socket. The great news is that as soon as new tissue grows to cover the exposed bone, the discomfort will end and healing will progress normally.

Dry Socket

It’s easy to treat – but may be uncomfortable

Dry socket (Alveolar Osteitis) can occur following the extraction of a permanent tooth.

Under a normal situation, a blood clot would form after the tooth is extracted. This blood clot would form a layer of protection for the bone below.

Dry socket occurs when the blood clot fails to develop or dissolves. This can leave the bone exposed to food, liquids fluids or even air: anything that can enter the mouth. This is where the discomfort comes in: the exposed area could remain painful for several days.

Anytime you suffer pain after a tooth extraction, it’s always a good idea to get in touch with your oral surgeon right away.

Treatment for dry socket

The comforting news is that dry socket does not require surgery. Your oral surgeon will examine the region, thoroughly clean it, and usually recommend one of more of these medications to help heal the socket

  • Antibacterial mouthwashes
  • Antiseptic solutions for the wound area
  • Medicated dressings

After the dressing has been removed, your oral surgeon will likely encourage you to promote healing by:

  • Taking pain medications as prescribed
  • Avoiding all tobacco products
  • Drinking lots of water
  • Rinsing your mouth gently with salt water several times a day
  • Brushing your teeth gently around the dry socket area

If you feel any pain or a worsening of the condition, be sure to call your oral surgeon immediately.

Did you know?

The precise cause of dry socket remains the subject of study. Researchers suspect that certain issues may be involved, such as:

  • Bacterial contamination of the socket
  • Trauma at the surgical site from a difficult extraction, as with an impacted wisdom tooth

Source: Mayo Clinic

Did you know?

Only about 2% of tooth extractions result in dry socket. The great news is that as soon as new tissue grows to cover the exposed bone, the discomfort will end and healing will progress normally.